bz.haerentanimo.net
New recipes

FDA Sets 'Action Level' On Arsenic In Apple Juice

FDA Sets 'Action Level' On Arsenic In Apple Juice


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


The agency issued the level after finding some 'exceptions' in the level of arsenic levels in apple juice

Inorganic Arsenic levels in apple juice have now been prohibited from being above 10 parts per billion

A childhood favorite just got safer, per order of the Food and Drug Administration.

The FDA proposed an “action level” of 10 parts per billion for inorganic arsenic in apple juice, according to a press release. This is the same level required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for arsenic in drinking water.

While the FDA assures that the levels of arsenic in apple juice have been consistently low, there have been “a few exceptions” over the past 20 years that the administration has been monitoring the juice.

“While the levels of arsenic in apple juice are very low, the FDA is proposing an action level to help prevent public exposure to the occasional lots of apple juice with arsenic levels above those permitted in drinking water,” said Michael R. Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, in a press release.

Inorganic arsenic is a carcinogen and has also has been linked to skin lesions, developmental effects, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, and diabetes. The substance is found in foods because it is in the environment, both as a “naturally occurring mineral” and because of use of arsenic-containing pesticides, according to a press release.


FDA: Action level for Arsenic in Apple Juice

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today proposed an “action level” of 10 parts per billion (ppb) for inorganic arsenic in apple juice. This is the same level set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for arsenic in drinking water.

“The FDA is committed to ensuring the safety of the American food supply and to doing what is necessary to protect public health,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. “We have been studying this issue comprehensively, and based on the agency’s data and analytical work, the FDA is confident in the overall safety of apple juice for children and adults.”

“While the levels of arsenic in apple juice are very low, the FDA is proposing an action level to help prevent public exposure to the occasional lots of apple juice with arsenic levels above those permitted in drinking water,” said Michael R. Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine.

The FDA is establishing this threshold to provide guidance to industry. The agency takes the action level into account when considering an enforcement action, if it finds a food product exceeds the threshold.

The FDA has been monitoring the presence of arsenic in apple juice for the past 20 years and has consistently found that samples contain levels of arsenic that are low, with few exceptions. New tools, however, have allowed the agency to better understand the breakdown between organic and inorganic arsenic levels. Last year the FDA released findings from its latest data collection and analysis of 94 samples of arsenic in apple juice. The analysis showed that 95 percent of the apple juice samples tested were below 10 ppb total arsenic 100 percent of the samples were below 10 ppb for inorganic arsenic, the carcinogenic form of arsenic.

The proposed level of 10 ppb takes into account this sampling data plus a recently completed, peer-reviewed risk assessment of inorganic arsenic in apple juice conducted by FDA scientists. The assessment is based on lifetime exposure.

Inorganic arsenic may be found in foods because it is present in the environment, both as a naturally occurring mineral and because of activity such as past use of arsenic-containing pesticides. A known carcinogen, inorganic arsenic also has been associated with skin lesions, developmental effects, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, and diabetes.

In conducting its new assessment on apple juice, the FDA was able to use data from two studies published in 2010, as well as a 2011 evaluation by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants of the Food and Agriculture Organization, part of the United Nations and the World Health Organization.

The agency will accept public comments on the proposed action level and the risk assessment for 60 days.


More On This.

Under the new regulation, apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion could be removed from the market and companies could face legal action. Agency officials stressed that the vast majority of juices on the market are already below the threshold.

"Overall the supply of apple juice is very safe and does not represent a threat to public health," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, in an interview with The Associated Press. "We decided to put forward this proposed action level to give guidance to industry and to assure ongoing safety and quality."

An FDA analysis of dozens of apple juice samples last year found that 95 percent were below the new level.

The standard specifically targets inorganic arsenic — the type found in pesticides — which can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if consumed at high levels or over a long period. Organic arsenic occurs naturally in dirt and soil and passes through the body quickly without causing harm, according to the FDA.

In 2008 FDA regulators set a "level of concern" for arsenic at 23 parts per billion in apple juice. The agency has the authority to seize juice that exceeds that level.

But agency officials played down the significance of the older figure this week, calling it a "back of the envelope" calculation that was used to assess one juice shipment detained at the border.

"It was not a full blown, science-based number," said Michael Taylor, FDA's deputy commissioner for foods.

The FDA's new number is based on lifetime exposure to arsenic and the potential for long-term cancer risk. Taylor says the number reflects a very cautious approach, since it's unclear how much arsenic exposure can trigger the disease.

"There isn't a known threshold for the carcinogenic effect, so we assume the possibility of effects all the way down to the lowest dose," Taylor said.

The agency will take comments on the draft regulation for 60 days before making it binding.

Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, last year called for a limit as low as 3 parts per billion. While the FDA didn't go that far, the group still praised the agency for taking action.

"While we had proposed a lower limit, we think this is a perfectly good first step to bring apple juice in line with the current drinking water limits," said Urvashi Rangan, the group's director for consumer safety.

While the Environmental Protection Agency sets arsenic limits for drinking water, there have never been similar standards for most foods and beverages. The FDA is also considering new limits on arsenic in rice, which is thought to have higher levels than most foods because it is grown in water on the ground, optimal conditions for absorbing the contaminant.

"We don't have standards like this in most foods, so it's an important precedent," Rangan said.

Environmental groups like Food and Water Watch have also lobbied the FDA on the issue. And television's Dr. Mehmet Oz made arsenic a national issue in 2011 when he raised an alarm — some say a false alarm — over apple juice, based on tests his show commissioned by a private lab.

All of the experts — including the government and the consumer advocates — agree that drinking small amounts of apple juice isn't harmful. The concern involves the effects of drinking large amounts of juice over long periods of time.

Another point of agreement is that children under 6 shouldn't be drinking much juice anyway, because it's high in calories. Health experts say children under 6 shouldn't drink any more than 6 ounces of juice a day — about the size of a juice box. Infants under 6 months shouldn't drink any juice at all.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Friday children should be encouraged to eat whole fruit adding, "it is not necessary to offer children any juice to have a well-balanced, healthy diet."


FDA Sets New Limits on Arsenic in Apple Juice

The FDA has announced that it&aposs setting new limits on the acceptable levels of arsenic allowed in apple juice, more than a year after pressure began from consumers and advocacy groups concerned over the arsenic&aposs effect on children. The agency is taking comments on the draft regulation for 60 days, reports the Huffington Post.

Highly popular, apple juice is only outsold by orange juice in the category, with apple juice more commonly being purchased for young children. Companies selling apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion of inorganic arsenic𠅌ommonly found in pesticides𠅌ould have their products pulled from stores and face legal action under the new regulation. But the FDA said most apple juice products are already far below that level. In a study conducted last year by the FDA, 95 percent of the samples had arsenic levels below the new regulation.

"Overall the supply of apple juice is very safe and does not represent a threat to public health," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, in an interview with The Associated Press. "We decided to put forward this proposed action level to give guidance to industry and to assure ongoing safety and quality."

Inorganic arsenic has potentially toxic effects and has been connected to an increased risk of cancer when consumed at high doses or for a long period of time.

The FDA first set a "level of concern" in 2008 for arsenic at 23 parts per billion. Pressure last year from the Consumers Union, which publishes Consumer Reports, asked the FDA to set the limit at 3 parts per billion.


FDA Sets New Limits on Arsenic in Apple Juice

The FDA is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant's effects on children. Nationwide, apple juice is second only to orange juice in popularity, according to industry groups.

In this Sept. 15, 2011 photo, an apple and a pitcher of apple juice are posed together in Moreland Hills, Ohio. The Food and Drug Administration is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant's effects on children. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Parents who have been fretting over the low levels of arsenic found in apple juice can feel better about buying one of their kids' favorite drinks.

The Food and Drug Administration is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant's effects on children. Nationwide, apple juice is second only to orange juice in popularity, according to industry groups.

Studies have shown that the juice contains very low levels of arsenic, a cancer-causing agent found in everything from water to soil to pesticides. The FDA has monitored arsenic in apple juice for decades and has long said the levels are not dangerous to consumers, in particular small children who favor fruit juice.

But now the agency is putting in place a strict standard on how much arsenic is acceptable in apple juice, limiting the amount to the same level currently permitted in drinking water.

Under the new regulation, apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion could be removed from the market and companies could face legal action. Agency officials stressed that the vast majority of juices on the market are already below the threshold.

"Overall the supply of apple juice is very safe and does not represent a threat to public health," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, in an interview with The Associated Press. "We decided to put forward this proposed action level to give guidance to industry and to assure ongoing safety and quality."

An FDA analysis of dozens of apple juice samples last year found that 95 percent were below the new level.

The standard specifically targets inorganic arsenic — the type found in pesticides — which can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if consumed at high levels or over a long period. Organic arsenic occurs naturally in dirt and soil and passes through the body quickly without causing harm, according to the FDA.

In 2008 FDA regulators set a "level of concern" for arsenic at 23 parts per billion in apple juice. The agency has the authority to seize juice that exceeds that level.

But agency officials played down the significance of the older figure this week, calling it a "back of the envelope" calculation that was used to assess one juice shipment detained at the border.

"It was not a full blown, science-based number," said Michael Taylor, FDA's deputy commissioner for foods.

The FDA's new number is based on lifetime exposure to arsenic and the potential for long-term cancer risk. Taylor says the number reflects a very cautious approach, since it's unclear how much arsenic exposure can trigger the disease.

"There isn't a known threshold for the carcinogenic effect, so we assume the possibility of effects all the way down to the lowest dose," Taylor said.

The agency will take comments on the draft regulation for 60 days before making it binding.

Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, last year called for a limit as low as 3 parts per billion. While the FDA didn't go that far, the group still praised the agency for taking action.

"While we had proposed a lower limit, we think this is a perfectly good first step to bring apple juice in line with the current drinking water limits," said Urvashi Rangan, the group's director for consumer safety.

While the Environmental Protection Agency sets arsenic limits for drinking water, there have never been similar standards for most foods and beverages. The FDA is also considering new limits on arsenic in rice, which is thought to have higher levels than most foods because it is grown in water on the ground, optimal conditions for absorbing the contaminant.

"We don't have standards like this in most foods, so it's an important precedent," Rangan said.

Environmental groups like Food and Water Watch have also lobbied the FDA on the issue. And television's Dr. Mehmet Oz made arsenic a national issue in 2011 when he raised an alarm — some say a false alarm — over apple juice, based on tests his show commissioned by a private lab.

All of the experts — including the government and the consumer advocates — agree that drinking small amounts of apple juice isn't harmful. The concern involves the effects of drinking large amounts of juice over long periods of time.

Another point of agreement is that children under 6 shouldn't be drinking much juice anyway, because it's high in calories. Health experts say children under 6 shouldn't drink any more than 6 ounces of juice a day — about the size of a juice box. Infants under 6 months shouldn't drink any juice at all.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Friday children should be encouraged to eat whole fruit adding, "it is not necessary to offer children any juice to have a well-balanced, healthy diet."


FDA Sets New Limits on Arsenic in Apple Juice

By MATTHEW PERRONE &bull Published July 13, 2013 &bull Updated on July 13, 2013 at 11:50 am

Parents who have been fretting over the low levels of arsenic found in apple juice can feel better about buying one of their kids' favorite drinks.

The Food and Drug Administration is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant's effects on children. Nationwide, apple juice is second only to orange juice in popularity, according to industry groups.

Studies have shown that the juice contains very low levels of arsenic, a cancer-causing agent found in everything from water to soil to pesticides. The FDA has monitored arsenic in apple juice for decades and has long said the levels are not dangerous to consumers, in particular small children who favor fruit juice.

U.S. & World

News from around the country and around the globe

Biden Won't Allow Justice Dept. to Seize Reporters' Records

Epstein Guards to Skirt Jail Time in Deal With Prosecutors

But now the agency is putting in place a strict standard on how much arsenic is acceptable in apple juice, limiting the amount to the same level currently permitted in drinking water.

Under the new regulation, apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion could be removed from the market and companies could face legal action. Agency officials stressed that the vast majority of juices on the market are already below the threshold.

"Overall the supply of apple juice is very safe and does not represent a threat to public health," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, in an interview with The Associated Press. "We decided to put forward this proposed action level to give guidance to industry and to assure ongoing safety and quality."

An FDA analysis of dozens of apple juice samples last year found that 95 percent were below the new level.

The standard specifically targets inorganic arsenic — the type found in pesticides — which can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if consumed at high levels or over a long period. Organic arsenic occurs naturally in dirt and soil and passes through the body quickly without causing harm, according to the FDA.

In 2008 FDA regulators set a "level of concern" for arsenic at 23 parts per billion in apple juice. The agency has the authority to seize juice that exceeds that level.

But agency officials played down the significance of the older figure this week, calling it a "back of the envelope" calculation that was used to assess one juice shipment detained at the border.

"It was not a full blown, science-based number," said Michael Taylor, FDA's deputy commissioner for foods.

The FDA's new number is based on lifetime exposure to arsenic and the potential for long-term cancer risk. Taylor says the number reflects a very cautious approach, since it's unclear how much arsenic exposure can trigger the disease.

"There isn't a known threshold for the carcinogenic effect, so we assume the possibility of effects all the way down to the lowest dose," Taylor said.

The agency will take comments on the draft regulation for 60 days before making it binding.

Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, last year called for a limit as low as 3 parts per billion. While the FDA didn't go that far, the group still praised the agency for taking action.

"While we had proposed a lower limit, we think this is a perfectly good first step to bring apple juice in line with the current drinking water limits," said Urvashi Rangan, the group's director for consumer safety.

While the Environmental Protection Agency sets arsenic limits for drinking water, there have never been similar standards for most foods and beverages. The FDA is also considering new limits on arsenic in rice, which is thought to have higher levels than most foods because it is grown in water on the ground, optimal conditions for absorbing the contaminant.

"We don't have standards like this in most foods, so it's an important precedent," Rangan said.

Environmental groups like Food and Water Watch have also lobbied the FDA on the issue. And television's Dr. Mehmet Oz made arsenic a national issue in 2011 when he raised an alarm — some say a false alarm — over apple juice, based on tests his show commissioned by a private lab.

All of the experts — including the government and the consumer advocates — agree that drinking small amounts of apple juice isn't harmful. The concern involves the effects of drinking large amounts of juice over long periods of time.

Another point of agreement is that children under 6 shouldn't be drinking much juice anyway, because it's high in calories. Health experts say children under 6 shouldn't drink any more than 6 ounces of juice a day — about the size of a juice box. Infants under 6 months shouldn't drink any juice at all.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Friday children should be encouraged to eat whole fruit adding, "it is not necessary to offer children any juice to have a well-balanced, healthy diet."

The Juice Products Association, which represents juice producers, said it is reviewing the FDA's proposal and risk assessment.

"Apple juice producers, as well as the FDA, want people to know they can be confident that apple juice is safe," said Rick Cristol, the group's president, in a statement.


FDA sets new limits on arsenic in apple juice

WASHINGTON – Parents who have been fretting over the low levels of arsenic found in apple juice can feel better about buying one of their kids’ favorite drinks.

The Food and Drug Administration is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant’s effects on children. Nationwide, apple juice is second only to orange juice in popularity, according to industry groups.

Studies have shown that the juice contains very low levels of arsenic, a cancer-causing agent found in everything from water to soil to pesticides. The FDA has monitored arsenic in apple juice for decades and has long said the levels are not dangerous to consumers, in particular small children who favor fruit juice.

But now the agency is putting in place a strict standard on how much arsenic is acceptable in apple juice, limiting the amount to the same level currently permitted in drinking water.

Under the new regulation, apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion could be removed from the market and companies could face legal action. Agency officials stressed that the vast majority of juices on the market are already below the threshold.

“Overall the supply of apple juice is very safe and does not represent a threat to public health,” said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, in an interview with The Associated Press. “We decided to put forward this proposed action level to give guidance to industry and to assure ongoing safety and quality.”

An FDA analysis of dozens of apple juice samples last year found that 95 percent were below the new level.

The standard specifically targets inorganic arsenic — the type found in pesticides — which can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if consumed at high levels or over a long period. Organic arsenic occurs naturally in dirt and soil and passes through the body quickly without causing harm, according to the FDA.

In 2008 FDA regulators set a “level of concern” for arsenic at 23 parts per billion in apple juice. The agency has the authority to seize juice that exceeds that level.

But agency officials played down the significance of the older figure this week, calling it a “back of the envelope” calculation that was used to assess one juice shipment detained at the border.

“It was not a full blown, science-based number,” said Michael Taylor, FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods.

The FDA’s new number is based on lifetime exposure to arsenic and the potential for long-term cancer risk. Taylor says the number reflects a very cautious approach, since it’s unclear how much arsenic exposure can trigger the disease.

“There isn’t a known threshold for the carcinogenic effect, so we assume the possibility of effects all the way down to the lowest dose,” Taylor said.

The agency will take comments on the draft regulation for 60 days before making it binding.

Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, last year called for a limit as low as 3 parts per billion. While the FDA didn’t go that far, the group still praised the agency for taking action.

“While we had proposed a lower limit, we think this is a perfectly good first step to bring apple juice in line with the current drinking water limits,” said Urvashi Rangan, the group’s director for consumer safety.

While the Environmental Protection Agency sets arsenic limits for drinking water, there have never been similar standards for most foods and beverages. The FDA is also considering new limits on arsenic in rice, which is thought to have higher levels than most foods because it is grown in water on the ground, optimal conditions for absorbing the contaminant.

“We don’t have standards like this in most foods, so it’s an important precedent,” Rangan said.

Environmental groups like Food and Water Watch have also lobbied the FDA on the issue. And television’s Dr. Mehmet Oz made arsenic a national issue in 2011 when he raised an alarm — some say a false alarm — over apple juice, based on tests his show commissioned by a private lab.

All of the experts — including the government and the consumer advocates — agree that drinking small amounts of apple juice isn’t harmful. The concern involves the effects of drinking large amounts of juice over long periods of time.

Another point of agreement is that children under 6 shouldn’t be drinking much juice anyway, because it’s high in calories. Health experts say children under 6 shouldn’t drink any more than 6 ounces of juice a day — about the size of a juice box. Infants under 6 months shouldn’t drink any juice at all.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Friday children should be encouraged to eat whole fruit adding, “it is not necessary to offer children any juice to have a well-balanced, healthy diet.”


FDA sets new limits on arsenic in apple juice

FILE - In this Sept. 15, 2011 photo, an apple and a pitcher of apple juice are posed together in Moreland Hills, Ohio. The Food and Drug Administration is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant's effects on children. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Parents who have been fretting over the low levels of arsenic found in apple juice can feel better about buying one of their kids' favorite drinks.

The Food and Drug Administration is setting a new limit on the level of arsenic allowed in apple juice, after more than a year of public pressure from consumer groups worried about the contaminant's effects on children. Nationwide, apple juice is second only to orange juice in popularity, according to industry groups.

Studies have shown that the juice contains very low levels of arsenic, a cancer-causing agent found in everything from water to soil to pesticides. The FDA has monitored arsenic in apple juice for decades and has long said the levels are not dangerous to consumers, in particular small children who favor fruit juice.

But now the agency is putting in place a strict standard on how much arsenic is acceptable in apple juice, limiting the amount to the same level currently permitted in drinking water.

Under the new regulation, apple juice containing more than 10 parts per billion could be removed from the market and companies could face legal action. Agency officials stressed that the vast majority of juices on the market are already below the threshold.

"Overall the supply of apple juice is very safe and does not represent a threat to public health," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, in an interview with The Associated Press. "We decided to put forward this proposed action level to give guidance to industry and to assure ongoing safety and quality."

An FDA analysis of dozens of apple juice samples last year found that 95 percent were below the new level.

The standard specifically targets inorganic arsenic — the type found in pesticides — which can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if consumed at high levels or over a long period. Organic arsenic occurs naturally in dirt and soil and passes through the body quickly without causing harm, according to the FDA.

In 2008 FDA regulators set a "level of concern" for arsenic at 23 parts per billion in apple juice. The agency has the authority to seize juice that exceeds that level.

But agency officials played down the significance of the older figure this week, calling it a "back of the envelope" calculation that was used to assess one juice shipment detained at the border.

"It was not a full blown, science-based number," said Michael Taylor, FDA's deputy commissioner for foods.

The FDA's new number is based on lifetime exposure to arsenic and the potential for long-term cancer risk. Taylor says the number reflects a very cautious approach, since it's unclear how much arsenic exposure can trigger the disease.

"There isn't a known threshold for the carcinogenic effect, so we assume the possibility of effects all the way down to the lowest dose," Taylor said.

The agency will take comments on the draft regulation for 60 days before making it binding.

Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, last year called for a limit as low as 3 parts per billion. While the FDA didn't go that far, the group still praised the agency for taking action.

"While we had proposed a lower limit, we think this is a perfectly good first step to bring apple juice in line with the current drinking water limits," said Urvashi Rangan, the group's director for consumer safety.

While the Environmental Protection Agency sets arsenic limits for drinking water, there have never been similar standards for most foods and beverages. The FDA is also considering new limits on arsenic in rice, which is thought to have higher levels than most foods because it is grown in water on the ground, optimal conditions for absorbing the contaminant.

"We don't have standards like this in most foods, so it's an important precedent," Rangan said.

Environmental groups like Food and Water Watch have also lobbied the FDA on the issue. And television's Dr. Mehmet Oz made arsenic a national issue in 2011 when he raised an alarm — some say a false alarm — over apple juice, based on tests his show commissioned by a private lab.

All of the experts — including the government and the consumer advocates — agree that drinking small amounts of apple juice isn't harmful. The concern involves the effects of drinking large amounts of juice over long periods of time.

Another point of agreement is that children under 6 shouldn't be drinking much juice anyway, because it's high in calories. Health experts say children under 6 shouldn't drink any more than 6 ounces of juice a day — about the size of a juice box. Infants under 6 months shouldn't drink any juice at all.

The American Academy of Pediatrics said Friday children should be encouraged to eat whole fruit adding, "it is not necessary to offer children any juice to have a well-balanced, healthy diet."

The Juice Products Association, which represents juice producers, said it is reviewing the FDA's proposal and risk assessment.

"Apple juice producers, as well as the FDA, want people to know they can be confident that apple juice is safe," said Rick Cristol, the group's president, in a statement.


Related Videos

Here's how to make your evaluation and treatment smoother

Few things are as scary as having to go to the emergency room. Perhaps, walking down the aisle (kidding!)? In truth, the E.R. is there to either save your life or to help you feel better. The important thing is that you utilize emergency services when you need to, and not allow fear of having a bad experience dissuade you from going. Interesting fact: according to the most updated CDC website, in 2016, the mean wait time to see a medical provider was 24 minutes in less busy emergency rooms and 48 minutes in the busier ones. Expectedly, people with more concerning symptoms such as chest pain are seen quicker than those with the complaint of a stubbed toe (I really did think I had broken it).

For those of you who are off to the emergency room, here are some (hopefully) helpful tips for making your evaluation and treatment smoother. Of course, depending on your symptoms and on whether you are being brought to the emergency room by an ambulance, you may not have the time or capacity to follow these tips (it's difficult to pack an overnight bag when you are unconscious).

Bring Another Set of Eyes and Ears

Whether it be a friend, family member or a work colleague. Having someone there to help advocate for you (asking the charge nurse why you haven't been seen in six hours) and to also listen to what the nurses and doctors tell you is extremely helpful. Additionally, s/he can act as a liaison and keep your other friends and family members informed of how you are doing.

Be Prepared

This step can be done months earlier in anticipation. You should keep an updated list of your current medications along with dosages (including vitamins and herbal supplements) as well as a record of your medication allergies. A great place to store this information is under notes if you use a smartphone. Otherwise, the old-fashioned method of keeping these details on a piece of paper tucked away in your wallet will also suffice. Other particulars you should keep handy are your insurance information, your doctor's name and phone number, a brief summary of your medical history, such as previous diagnoses such as asthma or kidney problems, and a list of your prior surgeries. For those of you with a history of heart disease or who are presenting to the emergency room with chest pain, shortness of breath or dizziness, having a copy of your most recent electrocardiogram (EKG), which is an image of your heart's electrical activity and can signify signs of heart disease, can be extremely helpful. In fact, you should consider keeping a copy of your most recent EKG under pictures if you use a smartphone, or in your wallet, if you are a technophobe.

Try to Be as Nice and Understanding as You Can Be

Clearly, you are likely very nervous and not yourself, as being in pain and not feeling well can bring out the worst in us. However, it is important to remember that the professionals in the emergency room are likely working their hardest and have the best of intentions, and you are likely not their only patient. Try to envision how you would respond if you had to deal with your worst self (frankly, I would probably call security and have myself thrown out).


FDA Sets Standard for Arsenic in Apple Juice

The FDA proposed on Friday an "action level" for arsenic in apple juice, with the goal of preventing exposure to unsafe levels of the inorganic form of the element.

The agency set the threshold at 10 parts per billion (ppb) of inorganic arsenic, which matches the standard for total arsenic -- both inorganic and organic -- set for drinking water by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). There has been no arsenic standard for fruit juices to date.

"The FDA is establishing this threshold to provide guidance to industry," according to a press release. "The agency takes the action level into account when considering an enforcement action, if it finds a food product exceeds the threshold."

But the FDA's action is not the same as the EPA's setting an arsenic standard, Aaron Barchowsky, PhD, of the University of Pittsburgh, explained in an interview with MedPage Today.

"This is actually an advisory and a level of concern such that the FDA would not go after a source of apple juice that is below that level of concern," which makes a difference in terms of regulation, he said.

He also said that the FDA's level is more conservative than the EPA's because the drinking water standard was based on the assumption that people drink 2 to 3 liters a day. It is assumed that people aren't drinking that much apple juice, "and probably if you did, you'd have much worse health problems than anything arsenic could do to you," Barchowsky said.

In announcing the action, the FDA maintained that apple juice remains largely safe, as it has in the past.

"We have been studying this issue comprehensively, and based on the agency's data and analytical work, the FDA is confident in the overall safety of apple juice for children and adults," FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, MD, said in a statement.

Although the agency has been monitoring arsenic levels in apple juice for the past 2 decades, the issue came to the forefront in September 2011, when Mehmet Oz, MD, a thoracic surgeon at Columbia University and host of The Dr. Oz Show, aired a segment on levels of arsenic found in popular brands of apple juice.

Oz reported that at least one sample from four of five brands had total levels of arsenic that exceeded the 10-ppb threshold established for drinking water.

The FDA and others criticized the report because the analysis did not distinguish between the organic form of arsenic, which is considered nontoxic, and the inorganic form, which has been tied to a range of health problems, including skin lesions, developmental defects, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, diabetes, and cancer. The agency had tried to convince Oz not to air the segment.

An analysis released by Consumer Reports in November 2011 provided some support for Oz. It showed that about 10% of the apple juice samples tested had total arsenic levels above 10 ppb and that most of the arsenic was, in fact, inorganic, counter to what the FDA had claimed.

After the Consumer Reports results were released, the FDA said that it was determining whether a guidance level should be set for arsenic in apple juice.

The agency said it based the new 10-ppb standard on two analyses. In the first, the agency tested 94 samples of apple juice, showing that 95% contained less than 10 ppb of total arsenic and all of them contained less than that level of inorganic arsenic.

The other analysis was an FDA-authored, peer-reviewed assessment of the long-term risk of cancer stemming from exposure to inorganic arsenic in apple juice.

"The resulting risk estimates indicate that there are per capita urinary tract and lung cancer risks of approximately 1 in 100,000," the authors wrote. That was based on a modeled disease rate of 8.0 cases (95% CI 0.0-21.3) per million people consuming an average amount of apple juice. The risk would be higher for people consuming more juice.

"At the 10 parts per billion [level] in apple juice, the public should be really reassured that there's a huge margin of safety there," Barchowsky said.


Watch the video: Application Case Studies on FDAs Action Letter Timing 16of16 GDF 2020


Comments:

  1. Miktilar

    This topic is simply incomparable :), it is interesting to me)))

  2. Mushicage

    In my opinion, you admit the mistake. I can defend my position. Write to me in PM, we'll talk.

  3. Polydamas

    yes it happens ...

  4. Eoghann

    Something my private messages are not sent, there is some kind of error

  5. Rollie

    yeah. not bad already

  6. Myles

    It is a pity that I cannot speak now - there is no free time. I'll be back - I will definitely express my opinion.

  7. Abd Al Sami

    The highest number of points is achieved. In this nothing there is a good idea. I agree.



Write a message